September 2012: Register Now for Campus Rainworks Challenge!

The United States Environmental Protection Agency is now registering student teams for the Campus Rainworks Challenge! The design contest for college and university students raises awareness of green infrastructure alternatives for stormwater management.

Omaha North High School students install two HOG tanks as part of their 2011 school renovation.

To participate, student teams, working with a faculty adviser, must submit design plans for a proposed green infrastructure project on their campus.

Teams must register by October 5 and submit their entries by  December 14, 2012. Winning entries will be selected by the EPA and announced in April 2013.

Our offer to participating student teams: incorporate Rainwater HOG tanks into a winning entry, and we will give you three HOG tanks.

Winning teams will earn a cash prize of $1,500 – $2,500 as well as $8,000 – $11,000 in funds for their faculty adviser to conduct research on green infrastructure.

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August 2012: Campus Rainworks Challenge

Omaha North High School students install two HOG tanks as part of their 2011 school renovation.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has launched Campus Rainworks Challenge, a student design contest engineered to raise awareness of green infrastructure alternatives for stormwater management.

Our offer to participating student teams: incorporate Rainwater HOG tanks into a winning entry, and we will give you three HOG tanks.

Registration opens September 4 and ends December 14, 2012. Winning entries will be selected by the EPA and announced in April 2013.

July 2012: HOG Distributors on Green Building

 Permascape Designs

Daly School elementary students gather in front of a two-HOG installation, supervised by Permascape Designs, at their Long Island school.

We must educate each day so that sustainable and environmentally friendly techniques become the new way of design and construction,” says Mark Scaramucci of Permascape Designs.

about HOG, Mark says:
“The Rainwater HOG is one of many new and innovative products that will change the way we live on this planet.”

 

Rogers Remodel

Architecture for Humanity featured the seven-HOG McKinley Elementary School installation, installed by Rogers Remodel, in their book: Design Like You Give a Damn 2.

I talk to everyone I can about ways to conserve, because I do think it’s that important that we make changes now, not only to save money but to save energy and water,” says certified Green Plumber Jamie Rogers of Rogers Remodel.

After installing HOGs at two schools, Jamie says:
“[HOGs are] a great hands-on demonstration about conservation for the kids.”

 

 

 

May 2012: Daly School Garden – Learning by Example

Elementary school kids in Port Washington, New York are in for a spring treat. Two rainwater HOG tanks were installed this May to water the John J. Daly Elementary School’s edible garden tended by students in third through fifth grade.

“It is a great upgrade for our garden and, most importantly, our kids,” said Principal Drew Graves.

The four-year-old garden is one of five school gardens in the Port Washington District, but it is the only one harvesting rainwater.

HOG tanks were landscape designer Mark Scaramucci of Permascape Designs‘ first choice for the Daly School rainwater catchment system. He needed 100 gallons of water storage to fit into a slim space, and the modular design of the HOGs made it possible for him to install two tanks, vertically, side by side. The green-minded Port Washington Facilities Director upcycled old wooden bleachers from the high school for the structure housing the tanks.
Mindy Germain is involved with sustainable projects, including the Daly School garden, in the area as Executive Director for Residents For A More Beautiful Port Washington and co-chair of the Daly Green Committee.  She says, “I liked [the HOG tank] not only for its technical purpose, but also for its innovative design that I thought the kids would connect with. At that age the “cool factor” weighs in on personal connection.”

Mark also notes that the HOG tanks are made of food-grade material, “so there are no worries about watering food-producing gardens.” The kids are growing lettuce, kale, radishes, string beans, and herbs in their garden. They learn organic gardening, water conservation, and composting. The two HOGs harvest approximately 175 gallons of water annually. Not to mention the kids connect with nature and get a tasty introduction to eating locally.

As Mindy says, “Kids learn that eating healthy from the garden can be delicious.”